Almonte

Logan Paul is the Mascot of Selfie Culture

Logan Paul Suicide Video. The media’s new scapegoat for a worldwide sin.

Let’s be real about the Logan Paul Suicide Video.

Selfie culture existed long before the term “selfie” was a thing. Documenting everything from violence to natural disasters to famine. All in the name of “awareness.” But were we really unaware that these things existed? There’s a fine line between news and entertainment. But they’re not mutually exclusive. Gossip is both news and entertainment. As well as controversial sites like Best Gore that pride themselves in spreading the good news about all the dangers in the world. To spread awareness.

Do we need more ISIS beheading videos to know they happen? A month’s worth of footage of trapped bodies under cement after an earthquake? 17 Years’ worth of media coverage to know how bad 9/11 was?

Why are you even watching a video of me reacting to Logan Paul’s reaction to death? There’s articles everywhere to read what happened. But you want my opinion. It’s entertainment.

Was Logan Paul wrong?

Well. Duh. We can unanimously agree that Logan Paul’s actions at Aokigahara were disgusting. However. He is the low hanging fruit when we have a conversation about what’s wrong with humanity. This is the perfect moment to see ourselves in his tremendous flaw.

Plenty can guess what happens in a place called “Suicide Forest.” We know what content we will indulge in when we read a headline like, “Youtube Star Logan Paul Captures Suicide in Vlog.” But we still click anyway. Morbid curiosity? Mind numbing entertainment? Who knows.

Everyday tragedies have become a spectacle for us to indulge in. Even when someone decides to end their lives to get away from it all, the very same kind of person they’ve loathed is in their face with a camera to make sure everyone can see them against their will. The privilege of being able to capture a moment has made us desensitized to this same moment. Then addicted. Obsessed over capturing everything before the memory fades. A birthday boy on walking an endless winter, clamping onto the ribbon of a helium-filled balloon. Paranoid that he won’t even feel when it slips between his gloved fingers. He can only watch in awe what he couldn’t feel. The balloon our fleeting humanity.

How We Made a Film in 7 Days

Watch how we made a “The Initiate” in 7 days.

Join Almonte, Tim Hann, Jinzo & Blaze in a discussion on making a film with an extremely short deadline.

This was mostly for the sake of an experimental challenge to test our passion for the arts. You should definitely spend more than 7 days on any piece. As with any painting, some films will take years to just write. Some written in 10 minutes. Time spent doesn’t equate to the quality of the work. The passion and how connected you feel to the piece is what determines the impact of the film. Think of this like a speed painting you see a starving artist performing in the streets. That’s right. Performing. There’s two stories happening.

  • The fabricated one that is being shot from a script.
  • The struggle of the creators on the journey to create a film.

The Beginning

I was conflicted on whether I should make a CreepyPasta about how I got robbed in East Harlem or making a hood, gang initiation film. But a third idea emerged in my mind spontaneously on the 24th of October.

What the hell is a Creepypasta?

‘CreepyPasta’ is a style of horror storytelling that usually revolves around urban legends you can find online that people narrate in Youtube mini audio-books. It derives from “Copypasta” which are viral text walls people copy-and-paste everywhere to avoid misfortune. The earliest form of this was chain letters–which precedes the internet. People would get anonymous letters in the mail saying, “Send this to 5 addresses or [insert bad thing] will happen to you.” Here’s an example of an online version:

What if these actually came true for people that did harm to others? Oftentimes we see horror films placed in suburban or rural countrysides. So I stuck to what I know best: the hood. A horror story revolving around inner city kids where the stalking robber– the one who was the initial source of the horror in ACT I and ACT II– was now victimized by a personification of his own guilt.

Jaquan the Hood Lantern.

Spoiler Alert: Jaquan turns Jojo the slasher’s brains into a chopped cheese in the end credits. And the film is punctuated by a voice-over of a Valley-Girl accented Becky saying “Wow only 4 dollars? That’s a steal.” Followed by Chad’s “I know right; I love this neighborhood.” A cute nod to the open-endedness that the horror of gentrification that Almonte has spoken about in his viral chopped cheese video.


Shooting a Film in 7 Days is nerve wrecking.

In fact I wouldn’t recommend anyone do this to their mental health.

I finally wrote an idea that I connected with on a very personal level. But Halloween was in 7 days. Day of the Dead was in 8 days. How the hell was I going to get the cast and crew to pull this off? The same way I pulled off my guerrilla style of shooting My Way. My first attempt at filmmaking with no experience in fight choreography or serious camera work. Except now I’m exponentially more skilled than I was when I was 16. There was no way I was going to let this idea taunt me for another year while I waited for Halloween of 2018 to come back around. By then I would have built even more film ideas and just abandoned the Initiate. I was tired of waiting and planning and not executing all these ideas that kept coming to mind.

There’s only one way to shoot a film in 7 days: Just do it.

Call your folks. Even if they’re not “real” actors. A great director and editor can make anyone look good. I wrote, directed/shot, & edited this. And for the first time, I produced video content that didn’t involve the marketing of my face.

Though I did play the Jaquan the Lantern. Shhh.

I was essentially a one-man crew. The support and patience I got from my cast was imperative. Including emotional support when I wanted to give up on this and try next year.  You are your own worst critic. Finding countless mistakes in audio, continuity errors, and etc. can be disheartening if you don’t have anyone to get you out of your artistic anxiety. Being a perfectionist doesn’t get anything finished.

 

Why I Quit Youtube

To quit Youtube isn’t an easy transition. But it’s a necessary one.

I quit Youtube as a primary video platform after ten dedicated years of grinding. Since before getting paid for vlogs in your room was a thing. My following watched the 11-year-old that made paper guns. The 15-year old-ranting about pet peeves. The 17 year old making amateur webisodes action-packed with martial arts in the hood. The 18 year old satirist comedy sketch director. The 20 year old political ranter. All life transitions loosely documented through videos on my channel.

However, it never really sat right with me whenever I was recognized on the street as “That Youtube guy.” Especially after the Youtube Ad-pocalypse, I thought to myself…

Here I am– basically an ambassador through my content, pushing all this traffic to YouTube for them to reap all the financial gain. I’ve gone viral quite a few times. I’ve even been on Pix11 News for my viral chopped cheese video. All of this monetized traffic was going to Youtube. While I struggle to pay my section 8 rent in the hood. And although Youtube pays a percentage to creators for their content, being branded as “that famous Youtuber” isn’t very empowering when you look at Vine’s demise. A mere reflection of Youtube’s inevitable doom. When Vine died, most Viners died. When Youtube dies, the Youtuber dies. Unless you…

Quit Youtube and seize the means of your own production.

There’s a lot for content creators on Youtube to complain about. False Content ID. Soft censorship. Demonetization. Views magically disappearing because of years of an unfixed bug. But at the end of the day, Youtube is a private company and they can do with their money as they please. It’s their platform. The only thing you can do is threaten to quit Youtube. And unless you’re someone as big as Pewdiepie, that’s not a big enough threat to make Youtube change their ways. There is always the next big star. But there is always the next big platform. Facebook freebooting has had content creators scrambling for solutions after they released their native video player. And the amount of traffic and shares Facebook video gets is ADDICTING. Naturally people started to just freeboot their own videos and post to Facebook. It feels better to see your video get 10,000 shares in a week on Facebook than to slowly watch Youtube’s shitty algorithm forward your video to a mere 5,000 out of 100,000 subscribers(and make $0 because you’re not ‘family friendly’). Wanna know what feels even better?

Having your own website.

It can get pretty expensive having a native video player when you’re an independent video maker like me. Youtube is a free platform that doesn’t charge you for any video space. They just make the money back easily with ads. If they wanted to, they could just pay you jack shit. Facebook does it. It doesn’t halt creators from constantly uploading content on Facebook. There’s an entire culture of Instagram comedians & models that rely on external sponsorships from apps like Brandbassador and hired commission work. The truth is, Youtube’s terms of service is subject to change without notice. It’s their site. We can complain about how they treat the creators that fuel their money all we want. They’re not obligated to make us comfortable on their site. So investing in your own brand and keeping all the glory to yourself is one of the most empowering things you can do. Not easy. But necessary.

And simply more professional. As opposed to sending someone a Youtube link to your director/actor reel, you can send clients to YOUR website. It adds value to your name to have your own platform. “Youtuber” doesn’t have to prefix your name any time someone talks about you. And you won’t be scrambling to find the next best thing when Youtube dies out.

Having your own platform is hard work. But it is at least more rewarding than working for days on a piece of content only for Youtube to block your video in some countries just because you said a dirty word. 

 

What to Do When You Have a Gay Son

The same thing you would do if you had a straight son.

Having a gay son is always made a spectacle

As if preparing for your child’s potential queerness is on par with being diagnosed with some terminal illness.

It’s not a tragedy to have a gay son. Not an inconvenience. Not some hypothetical hard premise to make small talk about at a dinner table. People are gay. People are straight. And all sorts of in-betweens.

What would I do if I had a gay son? The same thing I would do if I had a straight son.

But that’s not an interesting enough answer for you is it? Watch the satirical comedy sketch on what to do.

And enjoy the reaction people give you when you use this answer to such a silly question.

 

Watch the Pen Clique Break Down Almonte’s ‘Harlem Round Midnight’

These three cats nail the symbolism and juxtaposed sensory manipulation. Loud stench. Sour sight. Also — how the hell did Alpharaoh know the parka jacket was from Uniqlo? Anyway. There’s no question about their comprehension in their Harlem Round Midnight review. Let’s talk about the dynamic of their biases in relation to each other while formulating their final opinions.

The Pen Clique’s Harlem Round Midnight review is how all reaction videos should look. Set up with three different perspectives:

The Visionary — The Realist — The Empath/Dualist

All equally paramount. The Visionary — Kuya– says, “Wow I could definitely see where you’re trying to take this.” The Realist — Daniel — says, “This could have hit much harder and needs more.” The Empath/Dualist — Alpharoah — as an audience member says, “This isn’t very satisfying after such a setup.” But also says as a writer, “this makes sense and is done purposely by the writer.” He resonates with both. And he pretty much nails why the ending is so anticlimactic.  Alpharaoh notes how the beginning feels very personal and then becomes impersonal. He’s right.

Harlem Round Midnight’s style is inspired by the naturalistic style of short story To Build a Fire by Jack London. Spoiler Alert. He dies. The world keeps on spinning. The second to last line citing, ” the stars that leaped and danced and shone brightly in the cold sky. ” There is no punch line. No twist. The world lives on as is despite the suffering of man. In Harlem Round Midnight, “Some dreams never end” nods toward there being no resolution to the dreams and desires for those in poverty. Their dreams more often remaining just that. Dreams. “The night sweats faces– sodden in evaporated moonlight.” The faces of those afflicted by poverty remain soaked in the sweat created by this seemingly never-ending night. Admittedly, it was quite a fluffy way to put it. Word-swag as Daniel put it.

Something’s missing, though.

At 11:17, The Realist says something a bit convoluted. “I want some concise, contextual something. I want something that’s going to tie this into…um… something…” Some would just dismiss a criticism like this as just ‘hating.’ But it’s not. It’s very valid and relateable point. You can tell when something is missing. Oftentimes we don’t know what that something is. We just know we are left hanging; dissatisfied.  The Visionary explains that it’s probably exactly what the artist intended. While saying, ‘Well its like that on purpose’ is an easy cop out to defend something you like, Kuya isn’t wrong. Contemporary narratives have made us used to resolution and uniformity in works of art to the point that something always has to have a concise ending. But Harlem Round Midnight is meant to be more immersive than it is entertaining. The melancholic, open-ended nature of the piece is purposely meant to put the audience in the same, dissatisfied mood as the characters in Harlem Round Midnight. The Empath reminds them of how relateable this feeling is to the reality of people’s feelings everyday in cities like LA and NYC. This isn’t just a movie. It’s reality.

The Realist seems undecided as to whether he likes it or not. Mediocre. Yet Lit? It’s Okay. But it’s DOPE too. No shade. This was literally me after watching movies with rage-inducing endings like Gone Girl. Spoiler alert, he stays with her crazy ass.

That’s It.

 The three all seemed to enjoy Harlem Round Midnight from the start. But then unanimously had “That’s it?” written on their foreheads. Yeah. That’s it, man. It sucks, but that really is it. This poem shouldn’t make you feel cool or entertained afterward. I want you to feel how I felt when I wrote this, living surrounded by this reality every day. Empty, dissatisfied. Or maybe it really is just a shitty ending. You mostly remember the ending of a piece. It makes sense that The Realist is simultaneously intrigued yet disappointed in it.

Rate from 1-10?

Not a huge fan of putting numbers on art.

There are plenty of films I’ve watched with 44% on Rotten Tomatoes that were amazing. Plenty of pieces I’ve watched with 80% that were an absolute snooze-fest. There’s no truly honest way to rate something as subjective as poetry. Especially if you’re in a room full of a bunch of people that might influence your rating.

A critic admitting to enjoying something everyone else hates ruins their ‘credibility.’ Especially in the gaming industry where many companies are paid to review games. But what if they just genuinely enjoyed something no one else did?

I could never be offended by someone giving me a 2 and another critic giving me a 9. A piece of art resonates differently with every person. I would hope that poetry wouldn’t mirror the film industry’s elitist attitude of “You scored low. You’re just a hater. Can’t trust your judgement” VS “You scored too high. You’re too easily impressed. Can’t trust your judgement.” Sometimes people just don’t like things because they’re not feeling it. We can be as ‘objectively’ good by using all the literary devices and punchlines we want. But for some, it may not resonate with them. It is natural for them to not enjoy it.

Maybe the ending turned off the Realist and he simply doesn’t like it, but he feels the need to give it a decent score because he doesn’t want to seem like an asshole. Maybe the Visionary wanted to rank it higher but didn’t want to seem like a dickrider. Too many variables influence people’s number ratings for it to be a measure of something being enjoyable or not. I enjoyed Michael Bay’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles more than Dunkirk.

Sue me.

I probably won’t watch Dunkirk ever again. But I could definitely get smacc’d and watch TMNT with my boys.

But I get it. It seems each have a background in Slam poetry, which is a genre with a heavy expectation of punchlines and flamboyant delivery. The Visionary also points out that this is a poem written for visuals. Not Slam. If you try to separate the visuals from the text, neither will be satisfying. Because both are poetry. Harlem Round Midnight could never rank in a Slam Poetry contest (it’s too short anyway). And it doesn’t work for radio/podcast as Alpharaoh mentioned as well. You can’t take the lettuce and tomatoes off a Big Mac and rate it as a stand-alone burger.

The Visionary’s judgement is based on influence.

When people say Kendrick is the best MC, we know that we can find someone down the block in our hood that can beat him in a rap battle. The subjective influence of setting standards is also part of that praise.  We know 2001: A Space Odyssey isn’t the best of it’s kind. But it’s iconic because it created the new wave of mixing philosophy & symbolism into Sci-Fi. Like Kendrick made “Woke” rap mainstream again. You can be very talented and even skilled at something. But what really leaves your footprint after you die is your influence and if you change the game. Kuya sees this potential beyond the piece itself. What it can become for social media and giving poetry a wider reach.  The sky and beyond. Daniel wants to stay down to earth and be realistic about what practically makes something a good poem. The Empath says anything after this has to be FIRE.

When we watch things alone, we are all three of these people. These perspectives mirror the stages artists circle through when they experience another artist’s body of work.

 

The Initiate Film – Your Conscience Will Always Haunt You

Triggered by the trauma he’s inflicted against someone he once called friend, Jojo tries to run away from his own conscience in The Initiate Film.

Why join a Gang?

Belonging. Protection. Power.

Extreme poverty is a dangerous precedent for proximity crime. With plenty looking for a quick way to make ends meet–or keep up with the Jones’ on TV living a lavish Hip Hop lifestyle. Whether it be by selling drugs or robbing their neighbors of what little they have. In the dog-eat-dog world of capitalism, most choose to be a predator than to be a prey. And when the gang that runs the block gives you a stare-down every time you’re just trying to do laundry and live your life… if you can’t beat em, join em. In The Initiate film, Jojo does just that.

But betraying your own conscience comes with a price to pay. He can run, lie, or take whatever drugs he wants to try and forget his sins. But a man can’t escape what he has done.

Watch how we made this film in 7 days by clicking here.

Real Men Suck D!ck — Do You?

If Real Men Suck Dick for a Billion Dollars, would you?

There’s a lot you would do for a billion dollars. The real question is what wouldn’t you do for a billion dollars. Money’s coercive nature makes you reconsider what you wouldn’t otherwise do. Getting up at 5 in the morning with a hangover. Working at that fast food joint and serving people borderline poisonous food. Tolerating an abusive manager. Taking a gig with that annoying snob of a client with a six-figure net worth.

Money is the tool–not the motive. Money is the symbol of freedom in a capitalist society.

More money= More Freedumbs

More money to go on vacation. More money to get that boob job. More money to pursue those dreams of being a producer with the best gear in your town. Everything costs money. And if we can get our hands on money, we can buy anything — even people.

We all suck dick.

There’s a lot of things we would never do for free. Hell. People resort to murdering their family for insurance money before doing sex work. Ask any man if they would rather suck their homeboy’s dick or kill them to save their mother’s life. Sucking dick is the epitome of degradation for heterosexual men. To suck dick is to submit. To be anything but heterosexual is to sacrifice manhood. Heterosexual men doing anything remotely feminine is seen as “gay.”  Behaviors associated with women are seen as weak and undesirable. This is where homophobia and misogyny intersect.

Try this experiment

Go in a room full of men and ask; “Would you suck dick for a billion dollars?” Proceed to observe the stages of grief:

Denial

Hell naw man! That’s that gay shit! I would NEVER.

Anger

Man if any man came up to me asking me to suck his dick, that’s disrespectful! I’m knocking him out! I’ll kill that nigga and take the billion dollars!

Bargaining

I mean… how long you gotta suck it though? Is there a confidentiality agreement?

Depression

Damn but I really gotta suck it though? I can’t just do something else for the billion dollars?

Acceptance

I mean nobody gotta know. Fuck it.

The Power of Suggestion

Most people will hesitate to answer. The first few will answer. Everyone else will probably wind up agreeing to the consensus. A man will say “no” in one room and say “yes” in another if you ask him again next week.

What’s the point of Real Men Suck Dick?

Two Things.

To make you question the arbitrary definition of a “Real Man.”

To make you question how money influences your everyday decisions.

Cash cow artists in the music industry sell themselves out everyday. Changing their music, their values, and more… handing over their rights to labels for a million dollar deal… But God forbid a real nigga gotta suck some dick out here for a billion dollars.

A billion dollars.

That’s 1,000 millions. Think about it.

 

 

What’s the Big Deal about Almonte’s Nails?

Almonte joins Black Girl Politics to talk about Masculinity.
Of course, Almonte’s nails are a crucial point.

That’s the most concerning thing about masculinity, right?

It comes up at around 34:14

Even in the most casual, day to day choices like Almonte’s nails or tucking your shirt in, your masculinity is constantly challenged.

Almonte talks about being “otherized” even as a cis straight male by his cishet peers growing up in elementary school for wearing a messenger bag.

Do children even have a sexuality before they’re even thinking about sex? From birth we are bombarded with ideas of sex conflating with other dynamic ratios like masculinity:femininity , manhood:womanhood ,  etc. These challenges to your identity come from people all over the political spectrum.

Right wingers ask, “Are you gay? Why would you paint your nails if you aren’t?”

Leftists will ask, “Are you androgynous or agender? It’s great to see you reject the idea of gender.”

We constantly allow ourselves to be defined by these labels as if we weren’t the ones to create them in the first place. Even things as rigid as labels are fluidly defined according to how society changes. Otherwise, being called a bundle of sticks wouldn’t have been considered a slur if I had been in elementary school in 400 BCE.

So why does Almonte paint his nails?

Because he wants to. Nothing more nothing less.

 

 

 

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PS: Real Men Suck Dick.

Gary V Hiring Slaves– Ahem — Interns. He’s Hiring Interns.

Are you looking forward to Gary V hiring you? Your pay is $15.

Yup.

Look. I love Gary Vee. He’s the best motivational speaker leading this generation of entrepreneurs. But what could possibly justify paying someone McDonald’s money for video work?  He’s looking for dedicated young folks with the skills to create videos but, you know… young and ‘inexperienced’ enough to pay crumbs. The saddest part is that people would be STOKED to work with him. And that’s the exact issue with Gary V hiring young interns that would do anything to breathe the same air as him.

The problem is much bigger than Gary V honestly. Brands do this all the time. They gain a large audience and use their notoriety to exploit fans for cheap labor.

Keep it a stack. You would love work with big names like Jay Z, Beyonce, and Lady Gaga just for bragging rights.
At least your resume looks good(even if your bank account doesn’t).

Young creatives are just looking to get their foot in the door and establish some credibility. Getting paid crumbs can be overlooked if it means being able to hone your skills with their favorite celeb. Especially since being young usually means having less financial responsibilities like a mortgage or paying off a house. We even see this exploited when the social dynamic ratio of celebrity:fan is not so polarized. Example, videographers have to lower their prices to compete with the young cats unknowingly devaluing the market by doing extremely cheap work. I’ve been there; working entire music videos for 30 hours of shooting + editing for $150 commissions.

Popular brands continue this ageist tradition of targeting younger, impressionable creatives with too much ambition for their own good. It’s cheap and it works in a practical sense.

Look. Capitalism has never claimed to have the moral high ground. It’s up to us to take a stand and not engage in things like this.

Watch This Ridiculous A Boogie Parody ft. Metro Boomin

This A Boogie Parody Lowkey SLAPS.

Probably not as much as an actual Metro Boomin track. But good enough for Almonte playing B Boogie and @CallMeJinzo playing Metro Swipin for A Boogie Parody.

Everyone knows A Boogie wit Da Hoodie can make a catchy cadence. And let’s not forget how relateable his romantic tragedies are for a lot of youth living in the ghetto. But what often goes overlooked is his lyrical capabilities as a writer. For instance, in his melancholic “D.T.B.” he says:

“I know what a ten is, you not Serena.”

Allusion, or referencing, is a literary device used by many Hip Hop artists. Jazz artists have done it by playing melodies from famous or popular songs. They’re not meant to be caught by everyone. But if you’re one of the lucky ones, it’s like finding out your favorite celebrity has the same birthday as you. A Boogie is talking about Serena Williams here– or at least we think he is. For all we know, he could be talking about an Instagram baddie who’s name just so happens to be Serena. Maybe I’m biased because I think Selena Williams defines beauty.  To eliminate this confusion, A boogie plugs another literary device in there– Pun. 

“I know what I ten is…”

Ten is.

Tennis.

Reach?

Maybe.

When people think of A boogie they think someone that’s going to put them in their bag. Someone to make them feel raw, unadulterated emotion. No one really looks for technical rapping skill especially since he goes with a melodic, catchy style of rapping. Yet hearing a song on repeat might make you double-take on some of those multi-syllabic rhyme schemes. And he isn’t afraid of getting too on-the-nose with it in “Timeless”:

“2 seater Bentley and it’s topless
And she’s topless, naked bitch driver”

The melody gives a familiarity when you hear two homophones. Words that sound the same but mean two different things.

“We went from chillin’ in the projects to makin projects.” -Drowning

I felt the same munchies A Boogie felt while he wrote Quiet Storm freestyle. He describes his hunger for success by using hood jargon named after the components of a sandwich:

“So I started flipping onions just so I could get my bread up
But now I’m going ham in the building
Cause they ain’t let us
Saying fuck the mozzarella
Cause nigga I wanted cheddar
My heart colder than a case of beers in the freezer
This is how you niggas made me though.”

Some of these can be kind of hit or miss. Sometimes I find myself saying “Ooo that was hard” but most times it feels like comic relief. It’s fun. It’s relateable. And pretty clever without trying to hard to be. The fact that A Boogie has no issue speaking of emotional vulnerability in his songs doesn’t feel like a lot of hyper-masculine rappers we are used to seeing get big trying to come up with the hardest most off-the-wall line they could possibly create. The melody makes it seemless and not too jarring even if a line may fall flat for many people.

So.

This A Boogie parody pays tribute to how fun and ridiculous you can get with this. Complete with the whole using-“b*tch”-as-a-syllable-filler-to-confetti-your-song-style you see in Timeless.
And the saturated 808’s in this instrumental:

Here’s the lyrics:
Shorties think im autistic
I’m just artistic
Why you think they call me Artis
look what Artis did
They recognize me at Popeyes, yeah I pop eyes.
Ima hit you wit the nightstick
I got a nice dick
We used to smoke in the family Garden
Now I perform at the garden my family got in
Try to crash my VIP Ima let the guards in
Nigga who you think you guardin, I ain’t harden
Bitches need to hold up
But What’s the hold up ?
Niggas walk up in the club
Like this a hold up
Bitches know that Im a god Nigga you angel
get them Lights camera action,
Get them angles
Bitch How can you not see
That That’s a nazi
Man how could you hate Jews
I really hate chu
I be Furrowin my Eyebrows
While I Browse
We tried to eat Lettuce
Niggas won’t let us
How can I be vegan
Where do I begin?
Cheating at the hotel
Don’t let that hoe tell
These Butt hurt niggas gon need some bengay
Stressing me about my nails cause they really been gay
The avatar is angry
Cause I sucked aangs meat.
Yeah we in the drive thru
You know we drive through
Why you think they outchea?
cause they take out chairs.
Used to sleep in the living room
We don’t live in rooms
You know I’m eating Reese’s while I’m at recess
He said meet me at high bridge
Damn that’s a high bridge
What’s my occupation she steady Askin
I’m a lumberjack so I put that axe in
I’m a Harlem nigga
Said she like my accent
Said she like my melody
With staccato accents
I know you be lyin cause you a lion
I knew asked you for some water but you threw some lime in
You said you like the way I rap
When I be rhymin
But you gave me some Udon I asked for Ramen
Bitch You a fuckin omen
Nigga amen
Bitch You look just like a cheetah
Yeah you a cheater
Giving head up on my rooftop
You know that’s roof top
How could you tell me that’s not seed in you
Stupid fat bitch Man i could see it in you
Yeah I Used to work at Payless you know so I Pay less
Now You better have a PayPal or you gonna pay pal
Yeah she call me daddy I’m babysitting
She suck me like a bottle while my baby sittin
Now I’m Listening to my shit
While taking my shit
And if it’s a Sunday I eat a sundae
I be off on the weekends when the week ends
If you hungry with a stomachache, don’t let ya stomach ache
Recorded all my solos but it was so low
SHE SAID SHE WANT A CELL PHONE SO NOW SHE SELL PHONES
Take you to another planet we better plan it
When I need the right aid I go to Rite Aid
If you want the ketchup you better catch up
See a kid napping then kidnap him.
She say she want a hitter til I hit her.
She passed out when I farted that’s what my fart did.
She said she had a good night I told her goodnight
gay niggas drinking fruit punch yeah that fruit punch
Yeah I spank my mans buns
And pull his manbun
Had some chocolate in his latte,that’s chocolate
Niggas often say sometimes I’m Corny
Turn a nigga to a vegetable so he corny
Leave you in the hospital when I see you
Leave you in a coma in ICU.

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