FKA Twigs Bodied This New Apple Homepod Commercial

Apple HomePod Commercial Goes META w/ FKA Twigs & Anderson Paak.

FKA Twigs and Anderson Paak shape-shift our reality with their new Apple Homepod commercial. And it’s all over our social media feeds.

Director Spike Jonze begins with a glimpse of a bleak, exhaustively grey corporate world concluding for the day. Claustrophobia-inducing blocking creates a tunnel vision between us and our protagonist in a crowded train of faceless strangers. A bustling, rainy street no one wants to be on. A suffocating elevator that muffles her already-faint “Excuse me.” Calling FKA Twigs’ immersive performance mere acting almost feels like an insult. The serene silence illuminated by the first flick of her light switch warms the tone immediately. She punctuates the tension with, “Hey, Siri. Play me something I’d like.” Perfect pacing.

As the Anderson Paak’s ” ‘Til It’s Over” plays we feel the resolution crescendo with the music. Loosening up both our protagonist and the audience from what they thought was a serious-toned Apple Homepod commercial. As she begins to take life less seriously, so do we. The table and other rigid structures in her home that were built for her are now manipulated by her. She has become the master of her own universe. Shape-shifting everything that was flat from squares to hexagonal prisms. FKA Twigs takes it a step further by choreographing the light to dance with her.

But then.

She’s forced to look at herself in the mirror that she initially tries to ignore. As if offended by her own image. After changing all that’s around her, it’s now time to take a good look at herself. Confined by a mirror too small to frame her entirety. So she extends the mirror to see a bigger picture. All of who she is with space. Embraces herself. Literally stepping in and locking arms to dance herself through the darkness where this experience has allowed her to not only find herself. But to love herself. And in loving herself, letting go of the old version of who she was. Watch closely. It’s the new and improved version of herself that gets thrown on the couch. Renewed and uncolored–untainted by the pressures of the old, cluttered world. Her inner joy personified. Reborn. Inseminated by Apple’s HomePod that knew exactly how to bring out that side of herself. By simply playing what she likes.

A genius Apple HomePod commercial indeed.

Naruto & Dragonball Z is Trash. #DebateJeffro

This isn’t just a “Naruto is trash” meme to trigger Naruto fans. Naruto sucks. Seriously.

Naruto is trash. Lazy storytelling like exhausting flashback sequences every 10 minutes. Dragonball Z’s 3-episode long powerups. But hey. these are the anime moguls we all grew up knowing to love. And when most people think of anime, they think Naruto and Dragonball Z. Because it was their gateway into their anime addiction.

But we all know our first love is usually the worst.

Watch Jeffro’s video explaining why Naruto is trash.

Is he wrong? Comment your thoughts below.

Would You Date Your Best Friend’s Ex? #HurtBro

Would you be upset if your best friend slept with your ex? #HurtBro was.

But there’s two sides to every story. And #HurtBro now sees the error of his ways.

Watch two problematic best friends confront each other about lying and mistrust. Inspired by #HurtBae

Featuring @CallMeJinzo 

Comment below on whether or not you would date your best friend’s ex.

Jordan Peele First Black Screenwriter to Win Oscar While Black Panther Hits $1 Billion

Jordan Peele first Black screenwriter to win Best Original Screenplay oscar– nominated for Best Director and Best Picture.

An oscar on your first feature film is a big deal. A huge deal for an experimental film coined as the first of it’s genre. “Social horror.” Coming from a comedy background with his “Key and Peele” series, it’s important to note his decision to roam away from what he knew was already working for most Black comedians. Black comedy movies. Parody movies. Movies we have plenty of. Some of the most classic and beloved episodes of the Key and Peele series were ones that felt more like political satire. But he chose to create something that he could call his. While Get Out had many comedic undertones, its socio-political theme was what made it a classic to many Americans that could connect to this.

And right on time with Black Panther just hitting $1 Billion at the Box office after just four weeks of its release. Black people really meant business when #OscarsSoWhite was trending on Twitter two years ago. Suddenly movies like Hidden Colors, Birth of a Nation, Get Out, and Black Panther started gaining steam all over social media amongst millenials. Were doors opening once Hollywood realized they could capitalize on this political interest?

Black Millenials are the life-force of Black Panther

Black millenials have been tweeting about seeing Black Panther over 3 times at the movie theatre. Even calling bootlegging the movie blasphemy. Black youth is going to be a huge target market as they are the biggest, repeat supporters of movies with an almost-all-black cast. And even Koreans that don’t watch many Marvel movies found themselves to be particularly impressed with this one. Hollywood will start to realize that Black directed movies with a huge Black cast are extremely profitable. Everywhere.

Is there a catch? Will this lead to more doors opened for Black directors and eventual Black ownership over major film studios? Or will this just be a marketing phase to reel in more Black dollars? Leave us a comment letting us know your thoughts.

When You See Black Panther & Don’t Know How to Act

Watch Chio Dancing to Black Panther “Waterfall Fight” while she waits for the bus in New York City.

If you thought you couldn’t take Black people anywhere, wait until you see how we act after we leave the Black Panther Premiere.

You can take the Queen out of Wakanda. You can’t take the Wakanda out the Queen.

Dancer: @BabyGrrlChi

Jinzo Under a Harlem Scaffold After Dark

Watch Jinzo’s scaffold video dancing to this Great Dane track.

After shooting for another larger project in East Harlem’s CitiFresh supermarket, Jinzo and I passed by a beautiful scaffold. I always found the geometric patters and symmetry within them to be mesmerizing. A man-made, trypophobia-free spiral that provides you warmth from the winter winds. Inter-dimensional tunnels of beautiful overhead lighting and flashing headlights zooming by. Many find scaffold’s creepy and gritty. And I’m usually speed walking through the city to get to my destination. But I like to take my time when I’m walking under scaffold’s.

The leading lines created in these tunnels are always one of my favorite wide angles to get on camera. So I told Jinzo to throw on the hardest dark trap song he could think of.

Jinzo heard this song during JABBAWOCKEEZ NBA 2017 Finals performance and couldn’t resist killing it himself with this scaffold video.

Dancer: @CallMeJinzo 

Three Qualities of a Valuable Employee

Yo, bro. Eric needs to know three qualities that make him a valuable employee.

Co-directed by @Cvshmere

Featuring @CallMeJinzo

Featuring @Issa.Me.Bruh

Why I Bought a Cinema Camera — Unboxing the C100 Mark II

With so many affordable 4K options in the DSLR & Mirrorless market, why buy a cinema camera?

After years of contemplating what camera I should own, I decided to buy a cinema camera.

DSLR’s cameras have been an amazing low-budget option for aspiring filmmakers for the past decade. Especially with Technicolor’s FREE Cinestyle profile ‘hack’ that gives your Canon T3i  more dynamic range for a film look. More recently, Sony has been killing it with their affordable mirrorless cameras like the Sony A6300, boasting specs like 4K video resolution and slow motion 120 fps in full 1080 HD quality. S-Log is also a flat profile similar to Technicolor’s cinestyle that allots more room for post-production color grading. All for under 1,000 dollars. So does this render cinema cameras like the $3500 dollar Canon C100 Mark II with only 1080 60/fps obsolete?

Hell no.

Specs aren’t everything.

Look. I’ve gotten my hands on plenty cameras. From as humble as an Olympus T-100. To the Canon C500. Especially the top-notch iPhone’s F/1.8 lens with 4K 60FPS and Slow motion at 1080p 240 FPS. Sound fancy right? Already better specs than the dusty old $20,000 dollar C500 that only lets you record n00b frame rates of 30fps and no 4K. Womp womp. But specs aren’t everything. There’s a lot more science to image quality than just resolution. The 4K craze has been a marketing ploy to sell everyday consumers things they don’t need. Worse than when people obsessed over megapixels in cheap digital cameras. I cringe standing in the middle of a Best Buy seeing people awed by these on-screen 4K vs 1080P comparisons on 50-inch televisions… and seeing that the major selling difference are things like saturation, HDR, sharpness, and a whole bunch of other things that aren’t even pixel resolution. Looking at 720p footage of your favorite movie shot on film will look infinitely better than if they shot it in 4K on an iPhone. For obvious reasons.

As an online-based video content creator, having a 4K camera is about as useful as a bachelor’s degree is to a magician. It looks better on paper than it does in practice.

I can zoom in 4x while editing without losing quality. That’s about my only noticeable perk when using a 4K camera vs a 1080p one. For big-time cinematographers that screen on IMAX, it makes a huge difference. But here’s the thing. Big budget productions just rent cameras anyway. Being a poor filmmaker means the choice to own a camera is a commitment you should take as much time as you would to decide to marry someone. Buying a camera body only to sell it for half the price in a year or two is not resourceful at all. Especially with the rapidly growing technology and planned obsolescence that encourages consumers to treat pieces of equipment like stale chewing gum. I’m young yet old school. I want something that will deliver for a long time that feels good.

Yes. The feel of a cinema camera does make a difference.

And size and weight of a cinema camera. The light, run-and-gun feel of DSLR’s are a game changer for small filmmakers. Especially when you don’t want to spend thousands on steadicam and gimbal stabilizing devices. Cranes. Sliders. Rigs. Gear is usually cheaper when it’s used to handle lighter cameras. But there is such a thing as too light.

If you’re a fan of the handheld look, you will have less control and more shakes when your camera’s body is the size of your palm. Things feel a bit flimsy and definitely sketchy when you rent heavier cine lenses or even telephoto lenses for Sony’s mirrorless cameras. In extreme weather conditions, I don’t want to feel like the wind is about to blow away my camera. And all the physical buttons on a cinema camera allow me to skip the hassle of touch-screen nonsense in the cold. Audio and video ports right on-camera just make life easier during both production and post for a one-man crew. Cinema cameras are built for video. As opposed to being photo cameras that just so happen to have great video menu settings. So of course the practical limitations of DSLR and mirrorless cameras tally up heavily.


Saying you have a cinema camera has a similar effect as saying you have a 4K television. It just sounds and looks better to clients when you are shooting professionally. I’ve seen astounding results delivered on a Sony A7S II and the Canon Mark III for both commercial and film. Sure. It’s about the sculptor. Not the tools he uses. But that doesn’t stop clients from asking, “What kind of camera do you use? Does it shoot 4K? Should we rent a RED?” And to be fair, there is a significantly more noticeable difference in Sony A7S II vs RED dragon footage than the difference between 4K and 1080p. Behind the scenes photos look way more impressive to the standard consumer’s eye when you’re selling yourself as a cameraman. It’s always about the look. Including the look of the person behind the camera.

Without a doubt, you can make a great film on an iPhone. You can make a great film on anything really. It’s the impact of your story on your audience that determines the greatness of the film. The gear is just there to make it easier for what you are trying to achieve as practically as possible.

It always boils down to your personal needs. The Canon C100 cinema camera is what I need. I can count how many times I would really use 120 FPS slow motion footage. And my target audience isn’t watching 4K footage on their smartphones on the train from work. But they can definitely tell the noticeable difference in dynamic range.

Here’s the LINKS for my cinema camera gear:

Also check out this great video about picking a new camera:

‘Broke Rappers.’ I Don’t Do Free Shoots. Period.

No if’s. No and’s. No but’s.

Oh boy. The relationship between ‘broke rappers’ and actual broke video producers.

Or producers of any kind. Graphic designers. Web designers. Engineers. We’ve all had a run-in with a selectively cheap artist that brags about their lavish lives in their music. Then turns around and low-balls you for your services. ‘Broke rappers’ are usually not broke at all. Just dudes with f*cked up priorities and no respect for artistry. And an over-inflated sense of self.

Tell them to kick rocks. They probably won’t do it while they wear their new Balenciaga’s.

Sure there are genuinely starving artists that will actually barter some of their services for yours. And there’s nothing wrong with respectfully admitting, “this isn’t something I can afford right now. Hope to work with you in the future!” and keep it moving.


See what we’re not going to tolerate is someone devaluing our work and saying “can you lower the price” just because. A friend-of-a-friend discount.

I can’t walk into Best Buy and use an Instagram shout-out as a form of currency to buy a camera. So what makes you think you can pay someone in exposure for a skill that took a lot of time and money to develop?

Let’s take a step back. There are actual broke rappers.

Working video in Hip Hop is an interesting beast different from weddings, commercial, or film work. Probably the most fun you’ll have as a creator. Oftentimes gigs that are most fun tend to pay less. Especially in a genre that is literally the voice of the underprivileged. Artists turn to Hip Hop to express socio-economic hardship. They will make music by any means necessary. And sometimes being resourceful means hustling others into doing free work for them. I come from a place where my friends would pool money together from their 9-5 jobs and invest in an entry-level DSLR camera. Then just shoot it themselves. We didn’t even know what ISO was. We were just dedicated to learning by experience and doing what we could. But we definitely weren’t contacting professional-level producers that we knew had high rates to try to lower their prices… especially not offering to pay them in “exposure.”

Producers aren’t charging you these prices because they want to scam you. They do it because its how they keep the lights on. It’s how they’re able to afford to maintain their equipment and keep doing what they do. Video is especially important in boosting a music career. No one will take you seriously if you invest thousands in looking good or even on hours of studio time but won’t invest in the visuals. If you really can’t afford to pay a professional, study the craft and do it yourself. Don’t burn bridges by disrespecting the value of other artists.

How We Made a Film in 7 Days

Watch how we made a “The Initiate” in 7 days.

Join Almonte, Tim Hann, Jinzo & Blaze in a discussion on making a film with an extremely short deadline.

This was mostly for the sake of an experimental challenge to test our passion for the arts. You should definitely spend more than 7 days on any piece. As with any painting, some films will take years to just write. Some written in 10 minutes. Time spent doesn’t equate to the quality of the work. The passion and how connected you feel to the piece is what determines the impact of the film. Think of this like a speed painting you see a starving artist performing in the streets. That’s right. Performing. There’s two stories happening.

  • The fabricated one that is being shot from a script.
  • The struggle of the creators on the journey to create a film.

The Beginning

I was conflicted on whether I should make a CreepyPasta about how I got robbed in East Harlem or making a hood, gang initiation film. But a third idea emerged in my mind spontaneously on the 24th of October.

What the hell is a Creepypasta?

‘CreepyPasta’ is a style of horror storytelling that usually revolves around urban legends you can find online that people narrate in Youtube mini audio-books. It derives from “Copypasta” which are viral text walls people copy-and-paste everywhere to avoid misfortune. The earliest form of this was chain letters–which precedes the internet. People would get anonymous letters in the mail saying, “Send this to 5 addresses or [insert bad thing] will happen to you.” Here’s an example of an online version:

What if these actually came true for people that did harm to others? Oftentimes we see horror films placed in suburban or rural countrysides. So I stuck to what I know best: the hood. A horror story revolving around inner city kids where the stalking robber– the one who was the initial source of the horror in ACT I and ACT II– was now victimized by a personification of his own guilt.

Jaquan the Hood Lantern.

Spoiler Alert: Jaquan turns Jojo the slasher’s brains into a chopped cheese in the end credits. And the film is punctuated by a voice-over of a Valley-Girl accented Becky saying “Wow only 4 dollars? That’s a steal.” Followed by Chad’s “I know right; I love this neighborhood.” A cute nod to the open-endedness that the horror of gentrification that Almonte has spoken about in his viral chopped cheese video.

Shooting a Film in 7 Days is nerve wrecking.

In fact I wouldn’t recommend anyone do this to their mental health.

I finally wrote an idea that I connected with on a very personal level. But Halloween was in 7 days. Day of the Dead was in 8 days. How the hell was I going to get the cast and crew to pull this off? The same way I pulled off my guerrilla style of shooting My Way. My first attempt at filmmaking with no experience in fight choreography or serious camera work. Except now I’m exponentially more skilled than I was when I was 16. There was no way I was going to let this idea taunt me for another year while I waited for Halloween of 2018 to come back around. By then I would have built even more film ideas and just abandoned the Initiate. I was tired of waiting and planning and not executing all these ideas that kept coming to mind.

There’s only one way to shoot a film in 7 days: Just do it.

Call your folks. Even if they’re not “real” actors. A great director and editor can make anyone look good. I wrote, directed/shot, & edited this. And for the first time, I produced video content that didn’t involve the marketing of my face.

Though I did play the Jaquan the Lantern. Shhh.

I was essentially a one-man crew. The support and patience I got from my cast was imperative. Including emotional support when I wanted to give up on this and try next year.  You are your own worst critic. Finding countless mistakes in audio, continuity errors, and etc. can be disheartening if you don’t have anyone to get you out of your artistic anxiety. Being a perfectionist doesn’t get anything finished.


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